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«Ten Steps to Eating Perfectly»
~a powerful reminder that if you listen to what “they” say, you’re doing it wrong~

«Ten Steps to Eating Perfectly»

~a powerful reminder that if you listen to what “they” say, you’re doing it wrong~

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"The yoga mat is a good place to turn when talk therapy and anti-depressants aren’t enough."

— Amy Weintraub (via fuckyeahyoga)

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"Eating only raw foods has become quite the popular approach these days. In warm environments and for certain constitutions (pitta predominant) this can work. For many people agni (digestion) is not strong ehough to digest the raw food and particularly when living in cold environments. Warm, cooked foods work best for the majority of people. You may find warm cooked foods work best for you in winter and that you enjoy more raw food in summer. Raw foods digest more easily midday and while the sun is up rather than after sunset. Notice what works best for you and your body."

— Freedom In Your Relationship With Food: An Everyday Guide  (via weeatlikegods)

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"

Minimize or avoid nightshade vegetables. Some of the most common vegetables served in restaurants are the nightshades: potato, tomato, eggplant, bell peppers, and onions. They are rajas, contributing to overactivity of the mind. This change alone can make a signifcant difference in how you feel. Restaurants servce them because they are cheap, last a long time, are easy to store, and strong tasting - not because they are the healthiest for you.

If you have joint or digestive problems, eliminate the nightshade vegetables and see if it helps reduce or eliminate the problem. In the Yoga tradition, consuming nightshades is discouraged as they reduce vitality and cloud the mind. People often ask if this includes sweet potatoes; it does not. Most people do well with sweet potatoes: they digest easily and are quite nutritious.

"

— Freedom In Your Relationship With Food: An Everyday Guide (via weeatlikegods)

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ekco:

Yep, ignorance breads disease.

theatlantic:

Measles Outbreak Traced to Church Critical of Vaccines

Officially, measles has been eradicated in the Western Hemisphere. But even so, 25 people in Texas have caught the virus. And most of them go to a church associated with a preacher who has been critical of vaccines.
A visitor to the Eagle Mountain International Church who had recently been traveling brought measles back with him. Eagle Mountain is part of Kenneth Copeland Ministries—Copeland is a televangelist who has disparaged vaccines on his show (the segment starts around 20:10), saying things like, “You’re not putting Hepatitis B in an infant. That’s crazy, man. That is a shot for sexually transmitted disease… You don’t take the word of the guy that’s trying to give the shot about what’s good and what isn’t.”
Read more. [Image: Damian Dovarganes/AP]

ekco:

Yep, ignorance breads disease.

theatlantic:

Measles Outbreak Traced to Church Critical of Vaccines

Officially, measles has been eradicated in the Western Hemisphere. But even so, 25 people in Texas have caught the virus. And most of them go to a church associated with a preacher who has been critical of vaccines.

A visitor to the Eagle Mountain International Church who had recently been traveling brought measles back with him. Eagle Mountain is part of Kenneth Copeland Ministries—Copeland is a televangelist who has disparaged vaccines on his show (the segment starts around 20:10), saying things like, “You’re not putting Hepatitis B in an infant. That’s crazy, man. That is a shot for sexually transmitted disease… You don’t take the word of the guy that’s trying to give the shot about what’s good and what isn’t.”

Read more. [Image: Damian Dovarganes/AP]

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"As you walk and eat and travel, be where you are. Otherwise you will miss most of your life."

Siddhartha Gautama  (via somethingscosmic)

(Source: wellishouldatleasttry, via free-wilderness)

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"Live on coffee and flowers.
Try not to worry what the weather will be."

— Matt Berninger  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: seabois, via tea-trivia-deactivated20140307)

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jayparkinsonmd:

"Your life is going to be a gradual process of becoming kinder and more loving: Hurry up.  Speed it along.  Start right now.  There’s a confusion in each of us, a sickness, really: selfishness.  But there’s also a cure.  So be a good and proactive and even somewhat desperate patient on your own behalf – seek out the most efficacious anti-selfishness medicines, energetically, for the rest of your life.

Do all the other things, the ambitious things – travel, get rich, get famous, innovate, lead, fall in love, make and lose fortunes, swim naked in wild jungle rivers (after first having it tested for monkey poop) – but as you do, to the extent that you can, err in the direction of kindness.  Do those things that incline you toward the big questions, and avoid the things that would reduce you and make you trivial.  That luminous part of you that exists beyond personality – your soul, if you will – is as bright and shining as any that has ever been.  Bright as Shakespeare’s, bright as Gandhi’s, bright as Mother Theresa’s.  Clear away everything that keeps you separate from this secret luminous place.  Believe it exists, come to know it better, nurture it, share its fruits tirelessly.”

jayparkinsonmd:

"Your life is going to be a gradual process of becoming kinder and more loving: Hurry up. Speed it along. Start right now. There’s a confusion in each of us, a sickness, really: selfishness. But there’s also a cure. So be a good and proactive and even somewhat desperate patient on your own behalf – seek out the most efficacious anti-selfishness medicines, energetically, for the rest of your life.

Do all the other things, the ambitious things – travel, get rich, get famous, innovate, lead, fall in love, make and lose fortunes, swim naked in wild jungle rivers (after first having it tested for monkey poop) – but as you do, to the extent that you can, err in the direction of kindness. Do those things that incline you toward the big questions, and avoid the things that would reduce you and make you trivial. That luminous part of you that exists beyond personality – your soul, if you will – is as bright and shining as any that has ever been. Bright as Shakespeare’s, bright as Gandhi’s, bright as Mother Theresa’s. Clear away everything that keeps you separate from this secret luminous place. Believe it exists, come to know it better, nurture it, share its fruits tirelessly.”

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Nothing beats my grandmother’s whiskey sour recipe. Especially on days like today.

Nothing beats my grandmother’s whiskey sour recipe. Especially on days like today.

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Root beer floats have recently become my beautiful saving grace. I never used to have them when I was a kid because soda and ice cream (together?! what?!) just didn’t make sense to me.  So the fact that I reached for a pint of soy vanilla ice cream and a 4 pack of vintage root beer at Trader Joe’s last night is, I suppose, only fitting for how off the rails things have been lately. Luckily, there is nothing more suitable for this strange state than a pop float. 

HOW TO is pretty self explanatory. I will say, however, that there are two
critical control points you need to make sure you don’t screw up:
1. Let the ice cream and root beer hang out together for a while before you eat any of it. They’re pretty much strangers in their natural habitat, so you can’t expect them to do good things for you without at least a little time to get properly acquainted. After a few minutes, they warm up to each other quite a bit and you have the perfect fizzy smooth sweetness that you never knew could be created in a cup. 
2. Use a straw. No exceptions. Sorry Spoon, you don’t cut it this time. 

Life is good, foodies. Park your cute toosh on the couch and dive in, blasting “Float On” by Modest Mouse through your headphones.

Root beer floats have recently become my beautiful saving grace. I never used to have them when I was a kid because soda and ice cream (together?! what?!) just didn’t make sense to me. So the fact that I reached for a pint of soy vanilla ice cream and a 4 pack of vintage root beer at Trader Joe’s last night is, I suppose, only fitting for how off the rails things have been lately. Luckily, there is nothing more suitable for this strange state than a pop float.

HOW TO is pretty self explanatory. I will say, however, that there are two
critical control points you need to make sure you don’t screw up:
1. Let the ice cream and root beer hang out together for a while before you eat any of it. They’re pretty much strangers in their natural habitat, so you can’t expect them to do good things for you without at least a little time to get properly acquainted. After a few minutes, they warm up to each other quite a bit and you have the perfect fizzy smooth sweetness that you never knew could be created in a cup.
2. Use a straw. No exceptions. Sorry Spoon, you don’t cut it this time.

Life is good, foodies. Park your cute toosh on the couch and dive in, blasting “Float On” by Modest Mouse through your headphones.

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jayparkinsonmd:

In an effort to get New Yorkers to eat a little healthier, the city is launching a pilot program at two hospitals that will have New Yorkers receive “prescriptions” that can be used to purchase fruits and vegetables at farmers markets.
The program, which is part of a national campaign to help doctors change the eating habits of their patients, will focus on low-income, high-risk patients who desperately need to change their diet. The program will launch at Harlem Hospital and Lincoln Medical Center in the South Bronx.
Patients will receive Health Bucks, $2 coupons that can be used at any of the 142 farmers markets across the city. Doctors will then monitor the patients in the pilot program over the course of four months, and have their weight and body mass index evaluated by their doctor, as well receive counseling on healthy eating.
via

jayparkinsonmd:


In an effort to get New Yorkers to eat a little healthier, the city is launching a pilot program at two hospitals that will have New Yorkers receive “prescriptions” that can be used to purchase fruits and vegetables at farmers markets.

The program, which is part of a national campaign to help doctors change the eating habits of their patients, will focus on low-income, high-risk patients who desperately need to change their diet. The program will launch at Harlem Hospital and Lincoln Medical Center in the South Bronx.

Patients will receive Health Bucks, $2 coupons that can be used at any of the 142 farmers markets across the city. Doctors will then monitor the patients in the pilot program over the course of four months, and have their weight and body mass index evaluated by their doctor, as well receive counseling on healthy eating.

via

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wonderfulyou:

There are no wrong turns in life. Every decision you ever made brought you here, to this place, because you absolutely need to be here. Right now. Trust this, and you will find your way in everything and anything that life brings you.


#yogaeverydamnday

wonderfulyou:

There are no wrong turns in life. Every decision you ever made brought you here, to this place, because you absolutely need to be here. Right now. Trust this, and you will find your way in everything and anything that life brings you.


#yogaeverydamnday

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paradiseofveganhealth:

vegan fitlbr

Ooooh, fancy greens.